What went in to the making of the most hit Navratri songs

The high-spirited nine day Raas is here again and you cannot not dance to the upbeat and iconic Garba tracks. As a matter of fact, one cannot imagine Navratri without the foot tapping beats that get you grooving.  A lot of things come together to make these vivacious songs that keep the spirit of Navratri alive.  So, while you get ready to dance to the rhythm of these exhilarating songs, take a look at these surprising Navratri songs trivia that may have not heard of. 
 

1. O Sheronwali

Also known as 'Hai Naam Re’, this song is one of the oldest devotional songs dedicated to the Indian Goddess Durga. This song was also featured in the 1979 movie 'Suhaag’ starring Amitabh Bachchan and Rekha in a dramatic storyline. It gained popularity due to the classic Garba and dandiya raas which was rare to see in 1979.  The catchy tune also inspired several remakes, one of them being the major hit- Chogada Tara from the movie Loveyatri. This devotional navratri song is also similar to the song Maa Sherawali from Mard and Maa Sherawaliye from Khiladiyo ke Khiladi. 

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2. Chogada

This song is sure to give you the ultimate zeal for dandiya nights. 'Chogada' is an old Gujarati folk dandiya song remade in the Bollywood romantic drama film-Loveyatri. This upbeat song has gained more popularity than the original song. The choreographer, Vaibhavi Merchant, used flash mob performing Garba for the very first time in various locations. This hit song was shot in two extreme weather conditions, 40 degrees Celsius in Gujarat and 1-degree Celsius in London. Even the people in London enjoyed and were spotted by swaying to the rhythm of garba during the shoot. 

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3. Kamariya

Kamariya song from the horror comedy ‘Stree’ has hit not only the Navratri events but also the night clubs. Choreographed by Feroz Khan and Mudassar Khan, the song shot in the extremely narrow lanes of Gujarat. The song shooting was hindered when the vehicles were unable to reach the desired locations, resulting in the entire team to travel by rickshaw or bike to reach the shoot location. 

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4. Dholi Taro Dhol Baje

Is Navratri even Navratri without this classic song? ‘Dholi taaro dhol baje’ truly elevates your festive spirit. 
'Dholi Taro Dhol Baje' from 'Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam’ (1999) was Vaibhavi Merchant’s very first solo work in Bollywood for which she received a National Award for Choreography. The choreographer has shown fast-paced of Raas Garba with a bit of Dandiya steps.  In the year 2015, Sunny Leone starred in the remake of the song. The  new song is transformed into a Rajasthani folk number shot in the sand dunes of Jaisalmer with a crowd of over 500 dancers shooting for a long week in a scorching 48 degrees Celsius temperature. 

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5. Radha Kaise Na Jale

The song 'Radha Kaise Na Jale' is from the epic film ‘Lagaan’ released in the year 2001. This song is composed in Raag Bhimpalaasi, a raga believed to evoke romantic love and attraction. The song, choreographed by Saroj Khan, uses various dance forms like Raas Garba, Dandiya and a little bit of Bharatanatyam to add the extra zeal to the actress Gracy Singh’s performance. 
 

 

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6. Dholida

'The famous song 'Dholida' is from the film 'Loveyatri’. The choreography of which was done by Vaibhavi Merchant and performed by the newly-introduced fame Aayush Sharma and Warina Hussain. It was Aayush Sharma who challenged  the actress to perform her best that led to the success of her unbelievable performance in the movie. 

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7. Rangtaari

 'Rangtaari’ is yet another Navratri hit number from the movie ‘Loveyatri’. Choreographed by Vaibhavi Marchant, this song takes you the memories of your college days. Featuring over nine types of dance forms, Aayush Sharma has performed solo for the first time on this song. The video was shot in the Filmistaan Studio in Mumbai where the entire ‘Baroda’ set up was meticulously recreated.

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